Malware

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What kind of threat are you dealing with

Hoop Ransomware will try to lock your files, thus the categorization file-encrypting malware. Ransomware is another word for this kind of malicious software, one that may be more familiar to you. It is possible that the reason you have the contamination is because you opened a spam email attachment or obtained something from dubious sources. If you’re wondering about how file-encrypting malware may be prevented, read the following paragraphs carefully. Ransomware isn’t thought to be such a harmful infection for nothing, if you want to avoid possibly severe damage, be careful to not let it enter your computer. If you aren’t familiar with this kind of infection, it may be quite surprising to see that your files have been locked. Soon after you see that something is wrong, a ransom note will pop-up, which will disclose that in order to get the files back, you need to pay money. Do keep in mind who you are dealing with, as cyber criminals will unlikely feel any responsibility to aid you. It’s quite possible that you will not get assistance from them. Ransomware does damage worth hundreds of millions to businesses, and by paying, you’d only be supporting that. It should be mentioned that there are malware analysts who help victims in data recovery, so you may get lucky. Look into the free decryption software before even thinking about the payment option. And if file backup is available, you can just recover them after you remove Hoop Ransomware.

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Download Removal Toolto remove Hoop Ransomware

Hoop Ransomware spread methods

In this section, we will discuss how you might have gotten the threat in the first place. It isn’t uncommon for ransomware to use more complex spread methods, although it generally uses the basic ones. Many ransomware creators/distributors tend to send out infected spam emails and host the ransomware on various download sites, as those methods are rather low-level. You very likely got infected by opening an infected file attached to the email. Cyber criminals would be sold your email address by other cyber criminals, add the file infected with ransomware to an email that is made to seem somewhat legitimate and send it to you, hoping you wouldn’t wait to open it. It is not really that shocking that users fall for these emails, if it’s their first time coming across it. Look for particular signs that what you’re dealing with is dangerous, something like a nonsense email addresses and a text full of grammar mistakes. Big company names are often used in the emails so that receivers become more at ease. So, for example, if Amazon emails you, you still have to check whether the email address really belongs to the company. Check for your name mentioned anywhere in the email, in the greeting for example, and if it isn’t, that should raise alarm bells. If a company with whom you’ve had business before emails you, they’ll know your name, thus greetings like Member/User won’t be used. For example, if you’re a user of Amazon, your name will be automatically put into any email you are sent.

In case you want the short version, always check sender’s identity before opening an attachment. And when you are visiting suspicious sites, be cautious to not engage with ads. Those adverts won’t always be safe, and you may end up on a site that’ll initiate a dangerous download. Ads, especially ones on dubious web pages are rarely trustworthy, so avoid interacting with them. Download sources that aren’t regulated may easily be hosting malware, which is why you should stop downloading from them. If you’re regularly using torrents, the least you can do is to read people’s comments before downloading one. There are also situations where flaws in software could be used for infection. Keep your software updated so that malware cannot use the flaws. When software vendors become aware of the vulnerabilities, they it’s fixed in a patch, and all you really need to do is allow the fix to install.

What does Hoop Ransomware do

When the malware file is opened on your computer, the ransomware will start checking for files so as to encrypt them. It will primarily target documents and media files, as you are likely to think of them as valuable. When it has found the data, it uses a powerful encryption algorithm for their encryption. All affected ones will have a file attachment and this will help you recognize which files have been encrypted. You won’t be able to open them, and soon enough, a ransom note ought to pop up, which ought to contain information about paying a ransom in exchange for a decryptor. You might be requested a couple of thousands of dollars, or just $20, it all depends on the ransomware. While we’ve already said that complying with the requests is not the best choice, the choice is yours to make. There might be other methods to recover files, so research that before anything else. A free decryption software could be available so look into that in case malicious software researchers were able to crack the ransomware. You might also just not remember backing up your files, at least some of them. And if the ransomware did not erase the Shadow copies of your files, you should still be able to restore them with the Shadow Explorer program. And ensure you buy backup so that data loss doesn’t occur again. If you had taken the time to make backups for files, you ought to only restore them after you uninstall Hoop Ransomware.

Ways to delete Hoop Ransomware

If you’re not completely sure with what you’re doing, we do not advise you attempt manual elimination. One error might mean severe damage to your system. What you should do is acquire anti-malware, a utility that will do everything for you. Because those utilities are developed to erase Hoop Ransomware and other infections, there shouldn’t be any issues with the process. Your files will not be restored by the utility, however, as it does not have that ability. File restoring will be yours to do.

Download Removal Toolto remove Hoop Ransomware

Learn how to remove Hoop Ransomware from your computer

Step 1. Remove Hoop Ransomware using Safe Mode with Networking.

a) Step 1. Access Safe Mode with Networking.

For Windows 7/Vista/XP
  1. Start → Shutdown → Restart → OK. win-xp-restart Remove Hoop Ransomware
  2. Press and keep pressing F8 until Advanced Boot Options appears.
  3. Choose Safe Mode with Networking win-xp-safe-mode Remove Hoop Ransomware
For Windows 8/10 users
  1. Press the power button that appears at the Windows login screen. Press and hold Shift. Click Restart. win-10-restart Remove Hoop Ransomware
  2. Troubleshoot → Advanced options → Startup Settings → Restart. win-10-options Remove Hoop Ransomware
  3. Choose Enable Safe Mode with Networking. win-10-boot-menu Remove Hoop Ransomware

b) Step 2. Remove Hoop Ransomware.

You will now need to open your browser and download some kind of anti-malware software. Choose a trustworthy one, install it and have it scan your computer for malicious threats. When the ransomware is found, remove it. If, for some reason, you can't access Safe Mode with Networking, go with another option.

Step 2. Remove Hoop Ransomware using System Restore

a) Step 1. Access Safe Mode with Command Prompt.

For Windows 7/Vista/XP
  1. Start → Shutdown → Restart → OK. win-xp-restart Remove Hoop Ransomware
  2. Press and keep pressing F8 until Advanced Boot Options appears.
  3. Select Safe Mode with Command Prompt. win-xp-safe-mode Remove Hoop Ransomware
For Windows 8/10 users
  1. Press the power button that appears at the Windows login screen. Press and hold Shift. Click Restart. win-10-restart Remove Hoop Ransomware
  2. Troubleshoot → Advanced options → Startup Settings → Restart. win-10-options Remove Hoop Ransomware
  3. Choose Enable Safe Mode with Command Prompt. win-10-boot-menu Remove Hoop Ransomware

b) Step 2. Restore files and settings.

  1. You will need to type in cd restore in the window that appears. Press Enter.
  2. Type in rstrui.exe and again, press Enter. command-promt-restore Remove Hoop Ransomware
  3. A window will pop-up and you should press Next. Choose a restore point and press Next again. windows-restore-point Remove Hoop Ransomware
  4. Press Yes.
While this should have taken care of the ransomware, you might want to download anti-malware just to be sure no other threats are lurking.  

Step 3. Recover your data

While backup is essential, there is still quite a few users who do not have it. If you are one of them, you can try the below provided methods and you just might be able to recover files.

a) Using Data Recovery Pro to recover encrypted files.

  1. Download Data Recovery Pro, preferably from a trustworthy website.
  2. Scan your device for recoverable files. data-recovery-pro Remove Hoop Ransomware
  3. Recover them.

b) Restore files through Windows Previous Versions

If you had System Restore enabled, you can recover files through Windows Previous Versions.
  1. Find a file you want to recover.
  2. Right-click on it.
  3. Select Properties and then Previous versions. windows-previous-version Remove Hoop Ransomware
  4. Pick the version of the file you want to recover and press Restore.

c) Using Shadow Explorer to recover files

If you are lucky, the ransomware did not delete your shadow copies. They are made by your system automatically for when system crashes.
  1. Go to the official website (shadowexplorer.com) and acquire the Shadow Explorer application.
  2. Set up and open it.
  3. Press on the drop down menu and pick the disk you want. shadow-explorer Remove Hoop Ransomware
  4. If folders are recoverable, they will appear there. Press on the folder and then Export.

* SpyHunter scanner, published on this site, is intended to be used only as a detection tool. More info on SpyHunter. To use the removal functionality, you will need to purchase the full version of SpyHunter. If you wish to uninstall SpyHunter, click here.

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